Some reasons as to why Coronavirus is majorly killing black people in US
Source: https://www.bbc.com/

The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States has now passed 985,000, with the syndrome killing more than 55,000 individuals. But as novel coronavirus endures its march across all 50 states, unreasonably high numbers of black Americans are amid those dying from the syndrome.

Initial countrywide data released by the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends black Americans make up about 30 percent of COVID-19 patients, notwithstanding the fact only 13 percent of the US population is black. But much of that federal data is missing info on the racial individuality of those who have contracted COVID-19 – and some state and local figures splatter an even drabber picture. In Louisiana, black people make up 56 percent of those who have expired from COVID-19 but only 32 percent of the general populace. In Michigan, black folks comprise 40 percent of COVID-19 demises but just 13.8 percent of the state population. In cities, counties, and states that are recording racial data, the influence of coronavirus on the black community has been astonishing and disparate. Practically one-third of infections countrywide have affected black Americans, as per the Centers for Disease Control, though blacks signify only 13 percent of the U.S. population. Similarly, closely one-third of those who have expired across the nation are black, as per an analysis of available state and local data by the Associated Press.

Health researchers, journalists, and social scientists say there are numerous reasons why black communities are being unreasonably affected by a coronavirus. A lot of black Americans work in essential public-facing businesses such as retail, mass transit and food preparation, holding jobs that do not offer sick leave or health cover and which only raise sufficient wages for rental housing in regions abandoned by local authorities. African Americans are also at greater risk of chronic health complications such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease and obesity, pre-existing disorders that place more stress on those who fall ill with COVID-19. Racial justice advocates say the challenges that coronavirus poses to black communities in the US spring from decades of racist public policy and stereotyping.

All the social elements of health that you would look to so as to keep the community in good health are absent from our communities of color. With persons of color and African Americans especially, there are lots of problems they are coping with—health, socio-economic, poverty, education and systematic racism. With all those things together, it doesn’t shock people that these patients would be more susceptible to something like COVID-19. It is the healthcare inequality that is driving the epidemic. Other contributing elements, health differences experts say, are the close-knit nature of family, friends and church in the black community. Additional to that is overcapacity in urban regions and homes where several generations may share space.